Is good technique causing injuries?

Recently at the GX Day, I discussed the SAID (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands) principle. This is when the body becomes familiar and comfortable with performing a task in a specific manner, like a squat. So when the body is required to squat in an unfamiliar way (depending on what life throws at us), we get injured. We could discuss this at length from a client point of view, but what I am more interested in is the group fitness instructor. In 30 years of teaching and presenting, I have heard about more injuries and physiological issues from instructors than any of the thousands of clients that I have taught. This includes me. Yep, I am one of the countless instructors who has become injured due to the occupation.

So, riddle me this Batman…

If an instructor is performing the exercise with good technique and execution, in a way that would avoid injury, how is it that we are getting injured?! It doesn’t make sense. The whole point of good technique is that you can perform the exercise over and over again without getting injured. Right?

So this takes me back to the point that I was making earlier, the SAID principle. The issue is that doing the same thing, exactly the same way every time (regardless of perfect form), can lead to injury. The body is not getting enough variation on a frequent basis to create resilience. We basically lack functional resilience; the ability to handle any task that life throws at us. Isn’t this the whole point of what we sell to clients regarding exercise? Functional movement. Then why are we insisting on making our participants squat with ‘feet shoulder width apart’ all the time?? We just have to look at instructors to see what long term effects of lack of variety will do to the human body.

So it is time to change it up in a healthy way, and there are several ways that you can do this. If you would like to learn more about this check out the GX Day in Perth on 3rd November 2019, where I go in detail how you can stay healthy for longer and also pass this onto your participants.